How to Create Facebook Events Without Annoying Your Friends

It’s always nice to be included. That is, unless it’s a Facebook Event for a 20-piece recorder recital playing Nickleback’s greatest hits.Since Facebook added the ability to plan events and invite your friends a few years ago, it’s become one of the post popular online ways to organize get-togethers. It’s also a feature that pisses people off.

SEE ALSO: 20 Things Your Most Annoying Friends Do on Facebook

Are you part of the problem? Look at our tips above to learn how to be a more conscientious Facebook host.

What are your Facebook Event pet peeves? Let us know in the comments.

Photo via iStockPhoto, jgroup.

for more info: http://mashable.com/2013/01/31/facebook-events-annoying/

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Facebook Graph Search Will Find You The Perfect Date

A short film called “Online Now” appeared on the Internet last year. The film consists of a series of quick vignettes which create pretty great interpretation of how technology has invaded our lives. One of the scenes shows a young guy using Facebook to learn about a girl who recently went from “In a Relationship” to “Single”. By browsing her likes and interests he fakes a photo, learns about a band she’s into and ends up going on a date with her – all through Facebook. Had the new Facebook Graph Search been around when the filmmakers wrote this scene, it would have played out a little bit different.

I got access to Facebook Graph Search last week, and while messing around with some arbitrary search terms, I couldn’t stop thinking about “Online Now.” The film makes a great point: While social media is great for keeping in touch with friends and family, young people use it to easily, and sometimes dishonestly, browse for potential girlfriends and boyfriends. This idea is explained the best in “Social Network” when the fictional Mark Zuckerberg says, “Relationship status, interested in – this is what drives life in college.”

For more info: http://www.forbes.com/sites/mattmiller/2013/01/29/facebook-graph-search-date/

18 feb

How Many Facebook or LinkedIn Friends Do You Really Need?

Anybody who has spent more than a minute sweating over their online social networks needs an answer to this question. In fact when I began thinking about it I came across some pretty sad literature of young people shamed by their lack of Facebook friends.

Friends are important but I was thinking more about professional friends, colleagues, contacts. And asking myself: Is the emphasis on growing our network of connections blinding us to the value that people can bring to our careers?

for more info: http://goo.gl/vgG0L

7feb

Facebook Explains Why Vine Can’t Access Your Friends

Facebook has clarified its platform policies in response to the news that it has shut off friend-finding access to Twitter’s new video sharing app, Vine.

Within hours of Vine’s launch, the ability for users to find Facebook friends also using Vine disappeared. The move was not unlike a decision Twitter made in July to prevent Instagram users from continuing to find contacts using Twitter.

In a post on its Developer Blog, Facebook clarifies some of its platform policies. While not mentioning Vine by name, it’s clear this is the app the company is referring to when it writes:

For a much smaller number of apps that are using Facebook to either replicate our functionality or bootstrap their growth in a way that creates little value for people on Facebook, such as not providing users an easy way to share back to Facebook, we’ve had policies against this that we are further clarifying today

For more info: http://goo.gl/CZTyk

1 feb

How to Stop the Next Viral Facebook Post Outbreak

Citizens of Internetland: we are at war, and the enemy is a virus. Not the kind we’re used to hearing about, one that spreads via suspicious emails and turns our machines into mindless zombies for massive denial of service attacks, but one that is passed by human contact — specifically, posts on Facebook — and turns us into mindless zombies.

Monday’s outbreak of a fake privacy notice, one that urged users to claim back the copyright on their Facebook posts by making a declaration, was the last straw. Not only because it should have been blindingly obvious that this pseudo-legal babble was nonsense, but because the fake notice had done the rounds once already this year, back in July.

Luckily this one wasn’t a dangerous scam, like the Facebook post that claimed to offer free flights on Southwest but actually spammed your entire friend list, or the offer of a free iPad mini that got you to install a dubious app, or the “you’re tagged in a photo” honey trap. It was more of a chain letter, like the Facebook pricing scam.

For more info: http://mashable.com/2012/11/27/stop-fake-facebook-posts/

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